Featured Artisan: Padhma Creations

Padhma Creation’s Story

It almost seems too simple: a skein of wool saving a life.  For women of Nepal, beaten down by a complex and consuming social status, wool is a welcome reality.

IMG_5300-300x225Hasroon is one of these women.  Hasroon was married at 18 and living a happy life with her infant son and husband . . . until her in-laws began demanding dowry money.  When Hasroon’s family couldn’t pay, she was beaten, humiliated, and ultimately covered with gasoline, pushed into the bathroom, and set on fire. Today, Hasroon works for Padhma Creations, a social enterprise founded by Kesang Yudron.   Padhma is the Sanskrit word for lotus, the flower that emerges pure and white from the muddy swamp.  Kesang believes it is a fitting symbol for the women artisans, like Hasroom, who work at Padhma Creations.  Padhma Creations gives Hasroon the training and job she needs to provide a secure and supportive life for her and her son.

Padhma Creations partners with women from neighboring villages of Nepalgunj, Bardiya, and Surkhet in Nepal.  Wool is divided among their families who then make berets, scarves, socks, and other items in their homes or in shelters for women without homes. These woolens are then sold, and the money reinvested in programs to support the artisans and their children.  Kesang thought of the idea in 2000 when she and her father visited Nepalgunj, a border town between Nepal and India.

“I remember being shocked at the sight of a 13-year-old village girl being rescued from trafficking by the police,” Kesang said. “The story was that a distant relative of hers had intentions of selling her to a brothel in Mumbai. This incident created a lasting and profound impression on my life.”

Thousands of young Nepali women are trafficked to India every year for prostitution, child labor, and slavery, Kesang said.
Others are victims of domestic abuse.  All have no jobs or paying skills. “Padhma Creations not only helps these women but saves their families from a life of spiraling poverty. [In addition,] we want to raise awareness about the lives of people in other countries,” Kesang said. “Our hope is to influence a new generation of empathetic young adults  who will be socially conscious consumers.”

Or, like Kesang, they’ll become entrepreneurs investing in human life worldwide.

-Article from St. Benedicts College

In addition to providing above market wages for the women, Padhma aims to provide women artisans with health, education and social welfare programs.  And so, since 2011, Ganesh Himal Trading has contributed $1.00 for every item made by the group to a Worker Development Fund.  A Worker’s Development Fund is a social benefit package which compliments already existing fair wages and steady employment. The money that is set aside gives women in the group the chance to decide how that money can be used to create additional financial support for the artisan group as a whole. Since 2011 the women have chosen to use a portion of the funds to provide scholarships for their children.  Originally, these scholarships were prioritized for the women most in need, but as the fund grew the number of recipients grew and now, all of the children of Padhma knitters are on scholarship (49 children as of 2015).  In 2015 alone, Ganesh Himal contributed $6,345.  Additional funds have been used for medical expenses, funeral costs and family emergencies.

Artisan Spotlights

Radika Zenda

Radika is 34 years old and has been knitting for 3 years. She was introduced to the shelter project by friends in the neighborhood. Her income from knitting helps send her son to school since her husband does not support the family. In addition to knitting, she raises chickens.

Meera Balmiki

DSCN0418-2Meera is the master knitter at Padhma Creations. She travels to Kathmandu to learn the pattern from Pemala and then she trains the other knitters. At age 35, she has 1 brother who paid his own way through college, and 3 sisters, all of whom finished high school. Because of a tumor in her leg, Meera is unable to use a sewing machine, so she relies on her knitting skills to support herself and her family.

Kesang Yudron

DSCN0347-2Kesang Yudron first visited Nepalgunj as a high school student when her father wanted to train women of the area to knit.  A typical teenager, Kesang didn’t think much of the experience at the time.  After completing her accounting degree in Minnesota and working in a cubicle for a large company, however, she realized that she would rather serve her home community.   Inspired by the story of a 13 year old village girl being rescued from trafficking by the police in Nepagunj, Kesang founded Padhma Creations to provide women artisans with employm

Dhana Visht

Meera is the master knitter at Padhma Creations. She travels to Kathmandu to learn the pattern from Pemala and then she trains the other knitters. At age 35, she has 1 brother who paid his own way through college, and 3 sisters, all of whom finished high school. Because of a tumor in her leg, Meera is unable to use a sewing machine, so she relies on her knitting skills to support herself and her family.

A Small Sample of Padhma Creations Knitwear

See all of Padhma Creation’s Knits Here>

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